James V. Schall, S. J. 
Professor 
Department of Government
schallj@georgetown.edu 

Georgetown University 

 
 


Another Sort of Learning Web Site

JAMES V. SCHALL

INDEX OF WEB SITE TOPICS 

  1. Subject:
  2. TEACHING AND LEARNING
  3. SCHALL ON CHESTERTON
  4. SCHALL ON BELLOC
  5. SENSE AND NONSENSE
  6. LECTURES AND ADDRESSES
  7. NATURAL LAW
  8. CHRISTIAN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY
  9. CLASSICAL POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY
  10. AUGUSTINIAN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY
  11. THOMAS AQUINAS
  12. PAPACY IN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY
  13. WAR
  14. SPORTS AND PLAY
  15. POPULATION AND LIFE
  16. CATHOLICISM
  17. A STUDENT'S GUIDE TO LIBERAL LEARNING
  18. "SUNDRY SCHALL QUOTATIONS"
  19. ESSAYS: PHILOSOPHICAL, POLITICAL, ECONOMIC
  20. COLUMNS:
    a)  "ON LETTERS AND ESSAYS," UNIVERSITY BOOKMAN
    b)  "WIT AND WONDER," EXCELSIS
    c)  "ENGLISH ESSAYS," SAINT AUSTIN REVIEW
    d)  NATIONAL CATHOLIC REGISTER COLUMNS.
    e)  VARIOUS ON-LINE ESSAYS
  21. BIBLIOGRAPHY -- Chronological Listings:  Essays, Book Reviews, Letters to Editors, Journalism Articles Columns: Sense and Nonsense, Monitor Columns, Schall on Chesterton, Schall on Belloc, Wit and Wonder, English Essays, On Letters and Essays, National Catholic Register Articles -- 1954-Present.
NB. The copyrighted material is indicated on each item. Use of this material is always conditioned on proper credit. 

Anyone who wishes to comment on something in ANOTHER SORT OF LEARNING WEB SITE or to request any further information: 

E-mail address is: schallj@georgetown.edu 
Mailing Address is: Georgetown University, Washington, DC  20057-1200 



This Web Site's title comes from a book of mine by the same name, Another Sort of Learning. This site is not, however, devoted to the technical subject of "education," but rather to "learning," to anything worth knowing, especially things of the greatest human importance. What the reader of this ANOTHER SORT OF LEARNING WEB SITE will find are numerous suggestions about learning, about reading, about what to read. Many people, in reading what is said to be important, often miss the significance of what they are reading. They also miss a number, not too many, of very wise books that no one else recommends to them.

When someone opens this Web Site, he will, on looking at the Index above, find various items, things to read and to know about, things that, when actually read, he will find sometimes fascinating and delightful, sometimes sober and provoking, things of the greatest importance about what is. Likewise, I am a great fan of essays. Many sections listed in the Index will include selected essays, ones that I will change or add to from time to time on this Web Site.

My academic background is in political philosophy, itself a discipline that touches about everything. So some of that will be there. Naturally, I am interested religious issues. It often takes a lifetime to manage well one discipline or even one small area of a discipline. Still much is to be said for being interested in many things. Somehow, if you stick to just one thing, you will find that you will not know even that well, as other things are necessary as background or explanation. Nothing is wrong with this.

The amount of knowledge currently available to us is simply overwhelming. On the other hand, we are not gods. It is all right to be content with what we can know in the time given to us. The old notion about knowing a "little bit about a lot of things" is not at all a bad idea. The Index of ANOTHER SORT OF LEARNING WEB SITE gives an overview of the material presented here. In addition, along the way, there will be guides to the location of books and essays of, or those suggested by, the author .

The first thing we must have, however, is a certain curiosity about things. Samuel Johnson remarked on April 16, 1779, "I am always for getting a boy forward in his learning; for that is a sure good. I would let him at first read any English book which happens to engage his attention; because you have done a great deal when you have brought him to have entertainment from a book. He'll get better books afterwards." ANOTHER SORT OF LEARNING WEB SITE is designed to be a guide for everyone to this "forwardness" in "learning" and to this "afterwards" of "better books."



CURRICULUM VITAE -- James V. Schall 

BORN, JANUARY 20, 1928, IN POCAHONTAS, IOWA.

MEMBER OF THE CALIFORNIA PROVINCE OF THE SOCIETY OF JESUS, ORDAINED A ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST IN 1963.

PROFESSOR, DEPARTMENT OF GOVERNMENT, GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY, WASHINGTON, D. C., 20057-1200.

E-mail: schallj@georgetown.edu

TAUGHT AT THE GREGORIAN UNIVERSITY, ROME, ITALY, 1965-68, SPRING, 1969- 77; AT THE UNIVERSITY OF SAN FRANCISCO, FALL, 1969-77.

MEMBER, PONTIFICAL COMMISSION ON JUSTICE AND PEACE, ROME, 1977-82; MEMBER, NATIONAL COUNCIL ON THE HUMANITIES, OF THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES, 1984-90.

M.A. IN PHILOSOPHY, GONZAGA UNIVERSITY, 1955.

PH.D. IN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY, GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY, 1960.

M.A. IN SACRED THEOLOGY, SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY, 1964.

COLUMNS, (MONTHLY) 1) "SENSE AND NONSENSE," IN CRISIS, 2) "SCHALL ON CHESTERTON," in GILBERT!, 3) "ENGLISH ESSAYS," IN SAINT AUSTIN REVIEW, (QUARTERLY), 4) "ON ESSAYS AND LETTERS," UNIVERSITY BOOKMAN, 5) "WIT AND WONDER, EXCELSIS, 5) General columns in the National Catholic Register..

WRITTEN IN VARIOUS JOURNALS IN THE UNITED STATES, CANADA, EUROPE, AND AUSTRALIA. (SEE BIBLIOGRAPHY, #21).

 

Books

REDEEMING THE TIME. NEW YORK: SHEED & WARD, 1968.

HUMAN DIGNITY AND HUMAN NUMBERS. STATEN ISLAND, N. Y.: ALBA HOUSE, 1971.

PLAY ON: FROM GAMES TO CELEBRATIONS. PHILADELPHIA: FORTRESS PRESS, 1971.

FAR TOO EASILY PLEASED: A THEOLOGY OF PLAY, CONTEMPLATION, AND FESTIVITY. LOS ANGELES: BENZIGER/MACMILLAN, 1976.

THE PRAISE OF 'SONS OF BITCHES': ON THE WORSHIP OF GOD BY FALLEN MEN. SLOUGH, ENGLAND: ST. PAUL PUBLICATIONS, 1978.

THE SIXTH PAUL. CANFIELD, OH.: ALBA BOOKS, 1977.

WELCOME NUMBER 4,000.000,000. CANFIELD, OH.: ALBA BOOKS, 1977.

CHRISTIANITY AND LIFE. SAN FRANCISCO: IGNATIUS PRESS, 1981.

LIBERATION THEOLOGY. SAN FRANCISCO: IGNATIUS PRESS, 1982.

CHURCH, STATE, AND SOCIETY IN THE THOUGHT OF JOHN PAUL II. CHICAGO: FRANCISCAN HERALD PRESS, 1982.

THE DISTINCTIVENESS OF CHRISTIANITY. SAN FRANCISCO: IGNATIUS PRESS, 1983.

THE POLITICS OF HEAVEN AND HELL: CHRISTIAN THEMES FROM CLASSICAL, MEDIEVAL, AND MODERN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY. LANHAM, MD.: UNIVERSITY PRESS OF AMERICA, 1984.

UNEXPECTED MEDITATIONS LATE IN THE XXTH CENTURY, CHICAGO: FRANCISCAN HERALD PRESS, 1985.

REASON, REVELATION, AND THE FOUNDATIONS OF POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY, BATON ROUGE: LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY PRESS, 1987.

ANOTHER SORT OF LEARNING: HOW FINALLY TO ACQUIRE AN EDUCATION WHILE STILL IN COLLEGE OR ANYWHERE ELSE, CONTAINING SOME BELATED ADVICE ABOUT HOW TO EMPLOY YOUR LEISURE TIME WHEN ULTIMATE QUESTIONS REMAIN PERPLEXING IN SPITE OF YOUR HIGHEST EARNED ACADEMIC DEGREE, TOGETHER WITH SUNDRY BOOK LISTS NOWHERE ELSE IN CAPTIVITY TO BE FOUND. SAN FRANCISCO: IGNATIUS PRESS, 1988.

RELIGION, WEALTH, AND POVERTY, VANCOUVER, B. C.: FRASER INSTITUTE, 1990.

WHAT IS GOD LIKE?: PHILOSOPHERS AND "HERETICKS" ON THE TRIUNE GOD: THE SUNDRY PATHS OF ORTHODOXY FROM PLATO, AUGUSTINE, SAMUEL JOHNSON, NIETZSCHE, CAMUS, AND FLANNERY O'CONNOR, EVEN TO CHARLIE BROWN AND THE WODEHOUSE CLERGY, COLLEGEVILLE, MI.: MICHAEL GLAZER/LITURGICAL PRESS, 1992.

IDYLLS AND RAMBLES: LIGHTER CHRISTIAN ESSAYS, SAN FRANCISCO: IGNATIUS PRESS, 1994.

DOES CATHOLICISM STILL EXIST? STATEN ISLAND, N. Y.: ALBA HOUSE, 1994.

AT THE LIMITS OF POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: FROM "BRILLIANT ERRORS" TO THE THINGS OF UNCOMMON IMPORTANCE. WASHINGTON: THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA PRESS, 1996 (paperbound edition, 1998).

A PHILOSOPHER IN SOCIETY: THE POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY OF MARITAIN. LANHAM, MD.: ROWMAN & LITTLEFIELD, 1998.

REASON, REVELATION, AND HUMAN AFFAIRS: SELECTED WRITINGS OF JAMES V. SCHALL. EDITED BY MARC GUERRA. LANHAM, MD.: LEXINGTON BOOKS, 2001.

ON THE UNSERIOUSNESS OF HUMAN AFFAIRS: TEACHING, WRITING, PLAYING, BELIEVING, LECTURING, PHILOSOPHIZING, SINGING, DANCING. WILMINGTON, DE.: ISIBOOKS,2001.

TWO BOOKLETS: 1) JAMES V. SCHALL, S. J., A STUDENT'S GUIDE TO LIBERAL LEARNING (#17 in Index above), 2) A JOURNEY THROUGH LENT.

 

EDITED WITH INTRODUCTION:

THE WHOLE TRUTH ABOUT MAN: JOHN PAUL II TO UNIVERSITY STUDENTS AND FACULTIES. BOSTON: ST. PAUL EDITIONS, 1981.

SACRED IN ALL ITS FORMS. BOSTON: ST. PAUL EDITIONS, 1984.

OUT OF JUSTICE, PEACE. PASTORALS OF THE GERMAN AND FRENCH BISHOPS. SAN FRANCISCO: IGNATIUS PRESS, 1984.

G. K. CHESTERTON, COLLECTED WORKS, VOL. IV, WHAT'S WRONG WITH THE WORLD. SAN FRANCISCO: IGNATIUS PRESS, 1986.

(WITH JEROME J. HANUS), STUDIES IN RELIGION AND POLITICS. LANHAM, MD.: UNIVERSITY PRESS OF AMERICA, 1986.

ON THE INTELLIGIBILITY OF POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: ESSAYS OF CHARLES N. R. MCCOY. EDITED BY JAMES V. SCHALL AND JOHN J. SCHREMS. WASHINGTON: THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA PRESS, 1989.

(WITH GEORGE CAREY), ESSAYS IN CHRISTIANITY AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY. LANHAM, MD.: UNIVERSITY PRESS OF AMERICA, 1984.

 

STUDIES:

Jose Gualberto I. Villasis, Christian Political Philosophy in the Thought of James V. Schall. Dissertatio ad Lauream in Facultate Philosophiae apud Pontificam Universitatem S. Thoma in Urbe. Romae, 1999. 245 pp.

Marc Guerra, "James V. Schall on Politics and the Problem of Faith and Reason," Gregorianum, 82 (#2, 2001), 357-83.

John Hittinger, "James V. Schall on Faith, Reason, and Politics," in Liberty, Wisdom, and Grace (Lanham. MD.: Lexington Books, 2002), 189-93.

---------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Interviews:

1) Heather Roach," "Conversations about Ultimate Questions," The Georgetown Voice, October 19, 1989, 14.

2) Ed Santos, "Interview," Georgetown Magazine, Fall, 1989, 37.

3) Kristen Berg, "Campus Spotlight," The Georgetown Hoya, September 12, 2000. www.thehoya.com/features/091200/features3.htm

4) Bryana Hocking, "In Schall’s Sanctum," The Washington Times, September 6, 2001. www.washtimes.com/culture/20010906-32882928.htm

5) Desmond O’Grady, "Interview: Warning: To Be Up-to-Date Is to Be Out-of-Date," U. S. Catholic, XXXVI (August, 1971), 19-25.

 



Class Syllabi 

 Below are listed the Syllabi of each of the different Courses taught in recent years: 

1) Elements of Political Theory, 2) The Political Philosophy of Thomas Aquinas, 3) Classical Political Philosophy, 4) Christian and Medieval Political Thought, 5) The Political Philosophy of St. Augustine, 6) Contemporary Writers Interested in the Nature and History of Political Philosophy, 7) Plato's Political Philosophy, 8) Political Theory and Natural Law, 9) The Political Philosophy of Aristotle

 

1. ELEMENTS OF POLITICAL THEORY

ELEMENTS OF POLITICAL THEORY/Fall/2002 - 143-117 - Gov. Dp. -- Father J. Schall, S. J. - 657 ICC. Hrs.: M 10 - 11; W 1:20 - 2:20, by Appt. Tel. 7-4006. E-mail: schallj@georgetown.edu - Web: www.moreC.com/schall -- www.georgetown.edu/schall

1) A course designed for undergraduates to acquaint them with political philosophy (in contrast to constitutional, institutional, or area/national studies) as that theoretical discipline has been understood in ancient, medieval, and modern contexts.

2) Method: This course consists in a programmed reading of ten or so books by student and teacher. The student is expected to come to each class having regularly read the assigned sections of each book to gain a general and intelligent acquaintance with how the particular author thought about political things.

3) Classes are conducted in a dialogue fashion. Students are expected to attend each class after having read the assigned matter. This attendance and participation will be the main factor in evaluating the performance of the student. Please do not take this course unless you are willing to do this regular work, attend class on assigned days, and enjoy it. Absence from class is reason for lower or failing grades. Another Sort of Learning discusses class, grades, expectations. Students should read this book privately: 1st half before midterm, 2d by end of semester.

4) A final examination will be given on the assigned day. One mid-term will be given on the last class day before Semester Break about the matter studied up to that date (October 11). Assigned texts or your class notes may be used in any test in this class.

5) One short, four-page, double-spaced, typed term paper will be expected on the last day of class. Subject matter is as follows: A statement of the contents of one chapter or section (student's selection) in Plato, Aristotle, Simon, or other assigned text about how the chapter relates to the whole book and its argument. 1) Some outside reading on the topic chosen, 2) Footnotes, and 3) Bibliography will be expected (N.B.).

6) Books: Plato, Great Dialogues; Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics; Schall, At the Limits of Political Philosophy; Cicero, Selected Writings; Schall, Another Sort of Learning; Simon, General Theory of Authority; Schumacher, A Guide for the Perplexed; Deane, Political and Social Ideas of St. Augustine; Machiavelli, The Prince; Rousseau, Social Contract; Aquinas, Treatise on Law; Bloom, Shakespeare’s Politics; Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil. Titles are in the book store. The bookstore removes them early in October


2. THE POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY OF ST. THOMAS AQUINAS.

THE POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY OF ST. THOMAS AQUINAS, Spring, 2002, Government Department, J. Schall, S. J., 143-487. Office, 657, ICC, tel. 7-4006 or 5903. Office Hours, 10-11 Mon.; 1:20-2:20 Wed., or by Appointment. schallj@georgetown.edu web site -- www.moreC.com/schall/aquinas

1)This is a course designed for upper division undergraduate student. It will consist in a programmed reading and discussion of the significant texts of Thomas Aquinas on political philosophy. (This course is designed to follow a course on the Political Philosophy of Aristotle, though not required for this course).

2) Each student will be expected to write one term paper (two for graduate students) about 15-20 pages, footnoted, bibliographied, typed, proper academic form. Subject matter of each student's paper will be assigned shortly after the beginning of t he semester by the professor. This paper is due the last day of class (that is, last day of class, not test).

3) Students will be expected to attend each class. Absence from class is itself sufficient for lower grades or failure. The student who takes this course is expected to agree to the discipline of regular class attendance after having read the assigned text for each class. Students who do not expect to fulfill this requirement are requested not to take the course.

4) The classes will be conducted generally in a dialogue fashion. The student is expected to devote a reasonable amount of study for each day's class, to read the assigned matter before coming to class, to participate in the class on the basis of his reading. The student is thus expected to so discipline his daily study schedule to include approximately two to three hours to each class.

5) The books required for the class are in the bookstore. The student will need to have these books. They are: 1) St. Thomas Aquinas, Signumd, Readings; 2) Kreeft, Summa of the Summa; 3) Chesterton, St. Thomas Aquinas; 4)Aquinas, Commentary on Ethics; 5) Josef Pieper -- an Anthology; 6) Pieper, A Guide to St. Thomas.

6) There will also be some books on Aquinas on reserve. Each student is also expected to read Part I of Schall, Another Sort of Learning, on reserve, plus essay on Aquinas. A bibliography will be passed out. Check Thomas Aquinas on line – www.google.com, as well as Library sections on St. Thomas.


3. CLASSICAL POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY

Classical Political Philosophy -- 143-449. Fall, 1999, Father J. Schall, S. J. MWF 12:15-1:05

Office Hours: M 10-11, W 1:25-2:20, or by appointment. 657 ICC Tel. 74006, 7-6130. Fall, 1999. schallsj@georgetown.edu – web sites: www.moreC.com/schallwww.georgetown.edu/schall or www.georgetown.edu/faculty/schallj

1) This is a graduate/undergraduate course on Greek and Roman Political Philosophy.

2) Method: The course will consist in a programmed reading by student and teacher of some ten books, in which the student will be expected to read regularly assigned texts for each class. The student should try to keep a private journal or account of matter read. Dates, places, names are important.

3) The class will generally be conducted in a dialogue fashion. The student is expected to attend class regularly (n.b., each class) and a major element (the major element) in his grade will be derived from this regular reading and attendance. Please do not sign up for this course unless you agree to follow these requirement. Absence from class is itself a reason for lower grades or failure.

4) One term paper (two for graduate students) of about fifteen pages, double-spaced, footnoted, bibliography, will be due on the last day of class. This paper should be about a subject in political philosophy based on one of the main authors or on a major idea, such as Roman theory of empire or Plato. A tentative topic will be assigned to each student in class.

5) There will be a final examination on the subject matter of the course on the day assigned in the calendar. The student will be permitted to use assigned texts or class notes for this examination.

6) The books to be read are: Strauss, Argument and Action in Plato’s Laws; Sophocles, Theban Plays; Thucydides, Peloponnesian Wars; Marcus Aurelius, Meditations; Aristotle, Politics; Plato, Gorgias; Last Days; The Laws; Cicero, Selected Political Speeches; Epictetus, Handbook; The Stoic Philosophy of Seneca; J. Pieper, Divine Madness.. Get books before middle of October or Book Store removes them. There will be a reserve list in library.

7) "The decay of political philosophy into ideology reveals itself most obviously in the fact that in both research and teaching, political philosophy has been replaced by the history of political philosophy.... (This) is an absurdity: to replace political philosophy by the history of political philosophy means to replace a doctrine which claims to be true by a survey of more or less brilliant errors." -- Strauss, City and Man, p. 8.


 


4. CHRISTIAN AND MEDIEVAL POLITICAL THOUGHT.  

Govt. 143-448, Christian and Medieval Pol. Thought, Father Schall, Sp. 2001, Office 657, ICC, Hrs. M. 10-11; W. 1:20-2:20 pm, or by appointment. Tel. 7-4006; 6130. E-mail: schallj@georgetown.edu – Web Sites: www.moreC.com/schall

www.georgetown.edu/schall or www.georgetown.edu/faculty/schallj

1) A course in Christian and Medieval Political Theory, approximately Augustine to Marsilius of Padua.

2) Method: This course will consist in a programmed reading of some ten books by student and teacher, in which the student will be expected to come to each class having read regularly assigned sections of each book in order to gain a general and intelligent acquaintance with the thought of this era.

3) Classes are conducted in a dialogue fashion. Students are expected to attend each class after having read the assigned mater. This attendance and reading will be the main factor in evaluating the performance of the student. Please do NOT take this course unless you are willing to do this regular work and attend class on assigned days. Absence from class is itself a reason for a lowering of grades. (My Another Sort of Learning [on Reserve] discusses grades, purpose of class and study, please read if you have not). Students are expected to conduct themselves in an attentive and disciplined manner in each class.

4) A mid-term will be on March 2.; a final examination will be given on the assigned date in Schedule. Students will be able to use assigned texts or notes during this tests. The test will be a straight forward, objective essay test. The student who regularly and carefully reads the assigned texts should have no problem with the test.

5) One fifteen-twenty page academic term paper -- bibliography, footnotes, proper academic form -- will be expected on the last day of class (not on day of test). The professor will assign the topic to each student in due course.

6) Books to be read (to be found in the bookstore, please purchase before middle of March when books are removed; students are expected to possess a copy of books and bring them to class) are: 1) Morrall, Political Thought in Medieval Times; 2) Finnis, Aquinas; 3) O’Donovan, A Sourcebook in Christian Political Thought; 4) Gilson, Unity of Philosophical Experience; 5) Dawson, Religion and the Rise of Western Culture; 6) Pernou, Those Terrible Middle Ages; 7) Pieper, A Guide to St. Thomas.

[Texts used during previous time course was taught (for bibliographical information): 1) Political Philosophy of St. Augustine, Gateway, 2) Pieper, A Guide to St. Thomas, 3) Pieper, Scholasticism, 4) Derrick, Rule of Peace, 5) Dawson, Religion and the Rise of Western Culture, 6) St. Thomas, Hackett, 7) Adams, Mt. St. Michel and Chartres, 8) Rahner, Church and State in Early Middle Ages, 9) Cambridge History of Medieval Political Philosophy, 10) Lerner, Medieval Political Philosophy.]


 


5. POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY OF ST. AUGUSTINE,

143-498, Political Philosophy of St. Augustine, Spring, 2000, MWF, Schall, Office, ICC, 657, Government Department, tel. 687-5903, 4006. Hours: M 10; W 1:20-2:20, by appointment. schallj@georgetown.edu  

www.moreC.com/schall

1) This course will be a consideration of the Writings and Thought of St. Augustine particularly in so far as they refer to questions and issues of political philosophy.

2) The course will consist of a reading of a number of books of Augustine and about Augustine. Each student will be expected to attend each class, having read the assigned text for each class. Absence from class is itself cause for lower or non-passing grade. (Please read in Schall, "Another Sort of Learning" the two essays "What A Student Owes His Teacher" and "Grades"). A student who does not want seriously to commit himself to regular class attendance and reading is requested not to take this course.

3) These books will be found in the book store -- they are: The Confessions, The City of God, Fortin, Elshtain, Deane, Brown, Augustine, Against the Academics; V. Bourke. A number of books and essays on Augustine are on reserve, consult George. Numerous books and essays can be found in the library. Any problem consult professor. The literature by and about Augustine is vast. The student will be expected to have a general idea of Augustine's life and the period in which he lived, as well as of his subsequent influence.

4) Final examination on assigned day. A midterm the class before spring break. The test will be straight-forward. Assigned books or notes can be used. Each student will is to present a researched, reflective essay on some aspect of the Political Thought of St. Augustine, topic assigned by professor. This paper (about 15 pp) should contain bibliography and footnotes, due the last day of class.

5) The classes will be in dialogue fashion. The student should come to each class having read the assigned text, but not worried that somehow he will be asked a question or that he may not know the answers. The purpose is not to frighten or unsettle but to learn and to come to see the fascination in St. Augustine.

6) "Augustine: 'What does it seem to you that we wish to accomplish when we speak?" Adeodatus: "As it occurs to me now, either to teach or to learn." Augustine: "I see, and I agree to one of these points. For it is evident that when we speak, we wish to teach. But how do we learn?" Adeodatus: "How indeed except by asking questions?" Augustine: "Even then, as I understand it, we only wish to teach. For, I ask, do you question for any other reason except that you may teach what you wish to him you question?" Adeodatus: "That is true."

-- Augustine, De Magistro, Chapter I.


 


6. CONTEMPORARY WRITERS INTERESTED IN THE NATURE AND HISTORY OF POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY.  --  Gvt. 458  --  MWF  -- Schall, Fall, 1998, Office, 657 ICC, Hrs. M 10-11; W 1-2, or by appointment, Tel. 7-4006/5903. 

 1) This is a course designed to enable the student to read several significant books of writers dealing with what political philosophy is about, especially from its classic origins.  Emphasis this semester will be on reason and revelation theorie in politics. 

 2) There will be one fifteen-twenty page (for graduate students, two) term paper, as assigned by the professor, due last day of class.  It should be properly footnoted, bibliographied, in academic form and style.  There will be a final examination on the date in academic calendar. 

 3) Method:  Each class will have a specific assignment.  The student is expected to have read the assignment before attending class.  The class will generally be conducted in dialogue form.  Occasionally the student will be expected to present assigned material before the class.  The major part of the grade consists in the regularity of class attendance, preparation, response.  Each student is encouraged to read the materials on teaching, grading, and reading in Schall, Another Sort of Learning, which, along with other materials for course, is on the library reserve. 

 4) The books assigned (found in book store, please purchase before end of October as the book store removes them after that time) are the following:  1) Neuhaus, The End of Democracy (Spence), 2) Chesterton, Orthodoxy (Doubleday Image), 3) Tinder, The Political Meaning of Christianity (Harpers), 4) David Walsh, After Ideology, (CUAPress), 5) A. MacIntyre, After Virtue, (Notre Dame), 6) Schall, At the Limits of Political Philosophy, (CUAPress), 7) S. Orr, Jerusalem and Athens (Rowman and Littlefield), 8) C. Pickstock, After Writing:  The Liturgical Consummation of Philosophy (Blackwell's), 9) Bloom, The Closing of the American Mind (Simon and Schuster), 10) Solzhenitsyn at Harvard (Ethics and Public Policy). 

 5) Again, class attendance and preparation mandatory.  Please do not take this course if you have problems with class attendance and preparation.  The class requires a commitment of time for reading for each class in the student's daily or weekly schedule. 

 6) "The decay of political philosophy into ideology reveals itself most obviously in the fact that in both research and teaching, political philosophy has been replaced by the history of political philosophy.  The substitution can be excused as a well-meaning attempt to prevent, or at least to delay, the burial of a great tradition.  In fact it is not merely a half measure but an absurdity:  to replace political philosophy by the history of political philosophy means to replace a doctrine which claims to be true by a survey of more or less brilliant errors."  -- Leo Strauss, City and Man, (Chicago:  University of Chicago Press, 1964), pp. 7-8. 
 
 


7. PLATO'S POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY.

Government, 143-437, Plato's Political Philosophy, Father J. Schall, S. J., Fall, 2000.

M 10-11 am, Wed, 1:20-2:20 pm – Office Hours ( 657 ICC) -- or by appointment; tel, 7-4006. Tel.: 7-4006. E-mail schallj@georgetown.edu Web-site: www.moreC.com/schall

1) This class will consist in reading of Platonic dialogues in class. The student is expected to possess a copy of the Collected Works and to have read the assigned text before the class.

We will read: 1) The Apology, 2) The Crito, 3) The Phaedo, 4) The Republic, 5) The Gorgias, 6) The Symposium, 7) The Statesman, 8) the Phaedrus, 9) the Laws. We will probably read the "Seventh Letter" and some smaller dialogues. Joseph Pieper’s Enthusiasm and the Divine Madness, is the second required text besides the Hackett Collected Works.

2) Class attendance is required. Please do not miss class. Class attendance is a major part of Grades. The class will be conducted in a dialogue fashion. NB: read Schall, Another Sort of Learning, chapters "What A Student Owes His Teacher?" and "Grades" as well as the chapter, "On Teaching the Political Philosophy of Plato" (In book store or on reserve).

3) Many studies on Plato exist in the library. Students should refer to these sources, have their own Platonic collections. There will be a small reserve list at Reserve Shelf in Library.

4) Each student (graduate students two) will be expected to do a fifteen page term paper, footnoted and bibliographied on Plato's Political Thought. The paper should show signs of wide reading and consideration of Platonic works or studies on them. This paper can be on any dialogue or topic and, if the student prefers, the professor will assign topic. This paper is due the last day of class.

5) The student is free to consult Fr. Schall on any item pertaining to class assignment or work.

6) There will be a mid-term on Friday before semester break (Oct. 6) and a final on day assigned in schedule. Books and notes may be used in any test.

7) "Plato died at the age of 81. On the evening of his death he had a Thracian girl play the flute for him. The girl could not find the beat of the nomos. With a movement of his finger, Plato indicated to her the Measure." – Last words on Plato in Eric Voegelin, Order and History: Plato and Aristotle, p. 268.

8) Please read on www.moreC.com/schall under classical political philosophy (or in library copy) the essay from The American Scholar, (Summer, 1996), entitled "The Death of Plato."

9) "His (Socrates’) philosophy consists chiefly in exhorting people to virtue as the most valuable thing." – Leo Strauss, Studies in Platonic Political Philosophy, p. 45.


8. POLITICAL THEORY AND NATURAL LAW

Political Theory and Natural Law. Fall, 2002. Gov't 485. J. Schall, S. J., 657 ICC, Hrs, M 10-11; Wed. 1:20-2:20pm, or by appointment. Tel. 7-4006, 5903. Class, MW, 1:15-2:30. E-mail – schallj@georgetown.edu –

web sites – www.moreC.com/schallwww.georgetown.edu/schall or www.georgetown.edu/faculty/schallj

1) This course is designed for undergraduate students to acquaint them with the literature, tradition, and content of classical natural law discussions in political philosophy.

2) Method: The course is a programmed reading of some ten books by student and teacher. The student will be expected to come to each class having read the assigned material. There will be materials on natural law on reserve under my name in library.

Classes are conducted in a dialogue fashion. Class attendance is required; missing class is sufficient for lower or failing grades. Please do not take this course if regular class attendance and preparation is not possible or intended. The major element in grades consists in the persistency of regular reading and attendance. (See Schall, Another Sort of Learning, first section, for a description of what the instructor expects from the students -- on Reserve in Library or in bookstore).

3) A mid term will be given the last of class before spring break. A final test will be given on the assigned day in the bulletin on material read. Please expect to be at this test. There will be one term paper, due on the last day of class, fifteen or so pages, proper academic form, which means footnotes, adequate bibliography. The topic will be assigned by the instructor. Graduate students will be expected to do two papers. In all tests, all assigned books can be used.

4) Books: In the bookstore the following books should be available (there will also be books on reserve) -- please purchase before middle of October as book store removes them at that time. 1) Lewis, Mere Christianity; 2) d'Entreves, The Natural Law; 3) Rommen, Natural Law; 4) Finnis, Natural Law and Natural Right; 5) Hittinger, A Critique of the New Natural Law Theory; 6) George, In Defense of Natural Law; 7) Budziszewski, The Case for Natural Law; 8) Maritain, Natural Law; 9) McLean, Common Truths; 10), Simon, Tradition of Natural Law.

5) Thomas Aquinas: "To the natural law belongs everything to which a man is inclined according to his nature." (I-II, 94, 3).

6) Marcus Tullius Cicero: "True law is reason, right and natural, commanding people to fulfil their obligation and prohibiting and deterring them from doing wrong. Its validity is universal; it is immediate and eternal. Its commands and prohibitions apply effectively to good men, and those uninfluenced by them are bad. Any attempt to supercede this law, to repeal any part of it, is sinful; to cancel it entirely is impossible. Neither the Senate nor the Assembly can exempt us from its demands; we need no interpreter or expounder of it but ourselves. There will not be one law in Rome, one in Athens, or one now and one later, but all nations will be subject all the time to this one changeless and everlasting law." -- On the Commonwealth, III, 33.


9. THE POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY OF ARISTOTLE.  
The Political Philosophy of Aristotle. Government 143-456, Fall, 2001. Schall. Office: 657 ICC, Hours: M. 10-11; W. 1:20-2:20, or by appointment. Tel. 7-4006; 6130: E-mail, schallj@georgetown.edu; Web Sites:
www.moreC.com/schall www.georgetown.edu/schall

1) This course is a study of the principal elements in Aristotle's political philosophy, including the place of politics in Aristotle's general theory. In addition to the Politics, we will read The Ethics, The Poetics, and passages from The Rhetoric, the works that Aristotle designated as practical sciences. One of the purposes of the course is to learn what is a practical science.

2) Method, This course will generally be conducted in a dialogue fashion. The student is expected to attend class regularly. Repeat: the student is expected to attend class regularly. Absence from class is itself reason for a lower or failing grade. The student is expected to be present in class after having carefully read each class assignment. Each student is expected to set aside sufficient time for regular assignments and to order his life so that he can do the required material. Please expect to do this if you take this course.

3) There will be both a midterm on October 5 of the matter studied till that time and a final scheduled examination on day assigned. Each student will be expected to possess a copy of the assigned books. There will be a Reserve List in the Library of other materials on Aristotle. One 15-20 page term paper (two for graduate students) will be required, topic assigned by professor, due last day of class.

4) There are seven required books, to be found in the bookstore: 1) The Politics, 2) The Ethics, 3) The Rhetoric and the Poetics, 4) Arnhart, Aristotle on Political Reasoning, 5) Bodeus, The Political Dimensions of Aristotle's Ethics, 6) Strauss, City and Man, 6) Henry Veatch, Rational Man, and 7) Robert Sokolowski’s Commentary on Aristotle’s Politics. (Mode of acquiring will be announced in class.) The bookstore usually removes these books early in October.

5) I will at least mention five books about Aristotle (there are gillions) that would be well to read: 1) Henry Veatch, Aristotle, 2) Eric Voegelin, Plato and Aristotle, 3) R. G. Mulgan, Aristotle's Political Theory, 4) S. Salkever, Finding the Mean, and 5) Sir Ernest Barker, The Political Thought of Plato and Aristotle. M. Adler's Aristotle for Everybody is also good as is Mary Nichols’ Citizens and Statesmen. The literature on Aristotle’s Politics is vast.

6) "The direction of Aristotle to those that study politicks, is, first to examine and understand what has been written by the ancients on government; then to cast their eyes round upon the world, and consider by what causes the prosperity of communities is visibly influenced, and why some are worse, and others better administered.

"The same method must be pursued by him who hopes to become eminent in any other part of knowledge. The first task is to search the books, the next to contemplate nature. He must first possess himself of the intellectual treasures which the diligence of former ages has accumulated, and then endeavour to encrease them by his own collections.

"The mental disease of the present generation, is impatience of study, contempt of the great masters of ancient wisdom, and a disposition to rely wholly upon unassisted genius and natural sagacity." -- Samuel Johnson, The Rambler, Saturday, September 7, 1751.

 


ROMAN CATHOLIC POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY

Government, 143- , Spring, 2003.

1) This is a new course offering. It is designed to address the question of the relationship of Roman Catholicism to Political Philosophy. The course is naturally related to the Natural Law Course, to Aristotle, Plato, Augustine, and Aquinas. It is also aware of the "social teachings of the Church," though this is not its primary focus. The course will consider mainly contemporary writers who have addressed this topic.

2) The following books will be considered: 1) Robert Kraynak, Christian Faith and Modern Democracy, 2) Daniel Mahoney, De Gaulle: Statesmanship, Grandeur, and Modern Democracy; 3) David Walsh, After Ideology, 4) Peter Augustine Lawler, Aliens in America: The Strange Truth about Our Souls," 5) John Hittinger, Liberty, Wisdom, and Grace, 6) Tracey Rowland, Culture and Thomistic Philosophy, 7) Yves Simon, The Philosophy of Democratic Government, 8) John Paul II, Centesimus Annus, Evangelium Vitae, Veritatis Splendor, Fides et Ratio, 9) Leo Strauss, What Is Political Philosophy? 10) Michael Federici, Eric Voegelin, 11) John Milbank and Catherine Pickstock, Truth in Aquinas. (All books tentative). Also James V. Schall, Reason, Revelation, and the Foundations of Political Philosophy and At the Limits of Political Philosophy.

 

 



Book List 
Schall Books in Print, Prices, and Where to Order

For books:  Consult:

 

ANOTHER SORT OF LEARNING (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1988), 299 pp. $12.95. (From P.O. Box 1339, Ft. Collins, CO, 80522, $3 postage). ISBN 0-89870-183-x

AT THE LIMITS OF POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: FROM "BRILLIANT ERRORS" TO THINGS OF UNCOMMON IMPORTANCE (Washington: The Catholic University of America Press, 1996). 272 pp. $44.95, ISBN 0-8132-0832-7; paperback, ISBN 0-8132-0922-6, $19.95. (From The Catholic University of America Press, P. O. Box 4852, Hampden Station, Baltimore, MD. 21211).

CHRISTIANITY AND POLITICS (Boston: St. Paul Editions, 1981), 339 pp. $5.95. (From 50 St. Paul Ave., Boston, MA., 02130). ISBN 0-8198-1407-5

CHURCH, STATE, AND SOCIETY IN THE THOUGHT OF JOHN PAUL II (Chicago: Franciscan Herald, 1982), 202 pp. $7.50. (From Franciscan Press, Quincy College, Quincy, IL., 62301-2699, $3 postage). ISBN 0-8199-0838-X

DOES CATHOLICISM STILL EXIST? (Staten Island, N. Y.: Alba House, 1994), 260 pp. $13.95. (From 2187 Victory Blvd., Staten Island, N. Y., 10314-9976, tel. 1-800-343-ALBA (2522), $3.75 postage). ISBN 0-8189-0694-4

IDYLLS AND RAMBLES: LIGHTER CHRISTIAN ESSAYS (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1994), 240 pp. (From P. O. Box 1339, Ft. Collins, CO, 80522, $3 postage).

ISBN 0-89870-456-1

JACQUES MARITAIN: THE PHILOSOPHER IN SOCIETY (Lanham, MD.: Rowman & Littlefield, 1997. (From Rowman & Littlefield, 4720 Boston Way, Lanham, MD., 20706, ISBN 0847686833, $52 cloth; $19.95 paper).

LIBERATION THEOLOGY (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1982), 402 pp. $13.95. (From P. O. Box 1339, Ft. Collins, CO, 80522, $3 postage). ISBN O-89870-006-X

ON THE UNSERIOUSNESS OF HUMAN AFFAIRS. Wilmington, DE.: ISIBooks, 2001. 189 pp. ISBN 1-882926-63-3. (PO 4431, Wilmington, DE., 19807). $24.95.

REASON, REVELATION, AND THE FOUNDATIONS OF POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1987), 264 pp. $27.50) (From LSU Press, Baton Rouge, LA., 70809). ISBN O-8071-1303-4

REDEEMING THE TIME (New York: Sheed & Ward, 1968), 240 pp. $2. (From Theological Book Service, 7373 S. Lovers Lane Rd., Franklin, WI., 53132, tel. 1-800-558-0580).

LC 68-13845

RELIGION, WEALTH, AND POVERTY (Vancouver, B. C.: Fraser Institute, 1990), 224 pp. $14.95. (From Fraser Institute, 626 Bute Street, Vancouver, B. C., V6E 3M1, Canada, $3 postage). ISBN 0-88975-112-9

SCHALL ON CHESTERTON: TIMELY ESSAYS ON TIMELESS PARADOXES, (Washington: The Catholic University of America Press, 2000. 258 pp. $ 24.95 ISBN 0-8132-0963-3. (620 Michigan Ave, Washington, DC, 20064).

UNEXPECTED MEDITATIONS LATE IN THE XXTH CENTURY (Quincy, IL.: Franciscan Press, 1985), 142 pp. $15. (From Franciscan Press, Quincy College, Quincy, IL., 62301-2699, $3 postage). ISBN 0-8199-0885-1

WHAT IS GOD LIKE?: PHILOSOPHERS AND 'HERETICKS' ON THE TRIUNE GOD: THE SUNDRY PATHS OF ORTHODOXY FROM PLATO, AUGUSTINE, SAMUEL JOHNSON, NIETZSCHE, CAMUS, AND FLANNERY O'CONNOR, EVEN UNTO CHARLIE BROWN AND THE WODEHOUSE CLERGY (Collegeville, MI.: The Liturgical Press/Michael Glazer, 1992), 250 pp. $14.95. (From PO Box 7500 St. John's Abbey, Collegeville, MI., 56321-7500, $3 postage). ISBN 0-8146-5020-1 -- An edition of this book was published in Manila, P.I., by St. Paul's, 1995. (From St. Paul's, 7708 St. Paul Road, SAV, Makati, 1203, Metro Manila, Philippines, Fax (632) 890-7131.

ISBN 971-504-338-0

Booklets:

A STUDENT'S GUIDE TO LIBERAL LEARNING (Wilmington, DE.: Intercollegiate Studies Institute, 1997). 64 pp. $6,95. ISBN 1-882926-53-6 (ISIBooks, PO 4431, Wilmington, DE, 19807).

A JOURNEY THROUGH LENT (London: The Catholic Truth Society, 1976). 24 pp. $1.80. (38/40 Eccleston Square, London, SW1V 1PD, England).

 

Some of these books are clearly devoted to specific topics. I might add that someone just wanting to know something about the author's general outlook, I might suggest the following short books, not all of which are still in print: 1) Another Sort of Learning; 2) The Praise of 'Sons of Bitches': On the Worship of God by Fallen Men (this odd title comes in part from Arthur Miller); 3) Play on: From Games to Celebrations; 4) Idylls and Rambles: Lighter Christian Essays, 5) What Is God Like?, 6) Unexpected Meditations Late in the XXth Century, 7) Schall on Chesterton, and     8) On the Unseriousness of Human Affairs..